Category Archives: long distance relationships

How to Minimize the Stress Around Valentine’s Day with all the High Expectations


Valentine’s Day is one of those special occasions where we begin to think about ideas of how to make our partner have an unforgettable day long before Valentine’s Day has even approached. As a result of this, we often tend to overthink plans and gifts, which leads to a high amount of stress that could get in the way of our enjoyment of this very special day.

I will give you several perspectives on how to make Valentine’s Day a less stressful and more enjoyable experience.

1. Always, always be yourself. When we go out of our way to impress our partner, we often fall short because we are trying to be someone that we are not. It is helpful to keep in mind that your partner is yours, and they chose to be with you for who you are, so why try to change yourself? Some people might say that change is good, and I agree with that as long as you preserve and maintain the essence of who you are, even if you improve certain aspects of yourself.

2. Stick to what is relatively familiar. Based on your romantic relationship, you start to know what your partner likes and dislikes. Plan out a special dinner or a special outing based on what you and your partner like and enjoy. You can use previous successful outings as groundwork for creating a novel idea. Valentine’s Day is the day to step out of the box and try something new and unfamiliar, but it is important to stay grounded in reality and accept the fact that your plan might not turn out to be exactly the way you wanted it to. By having this thought in the back of your mind, you are likely to feel less stressed out if your plan doesn’t go exactly as planned.

3. Plan ahead of time. If you leave yourself to the last minute to plan your day and buy the gifts, then you might be putting yourself under more stress, and you might start second-guessing yourself about what you have arranged. However, if you plan ahead of time, and arrange things piece by piece, then you are likely to have more time to think about what you might be missing (whether it is gifts or any other thing that you might need to have a splendid Valentine’s Day). This will help minimize the stress.

4. Trust yourself, and know that you have given it your best. At the end of the day, Valentine’s Day is about the feelings that you show your partner, more than it is about the plans that you arrange for them and the gifts that you give them. It is helpful to bear in mind that you have done your absolute best to make this special day as memorable as possible.

By: Ghinwa El-Ariss

Ghinwa El-Ariss holds an Honors Bachelor of Science Degree in Psychology and Environmental Studies from the University of Toronto. She will be pursuing her Master of Science degree in Psychology at Trent University starting September 2017. She is passionate about Psychology and the Environment. She hopes that her blog posts help you learn a bit about her and her take on certain things. Most importantly, she hopes that you enjoyed what you read!

 

Loving You From A Distance -II


As weeks pass by, some things get easier while some only get harder day by day. I have become accustomed to not seeing my boyfriend on a daily basis. Surprisingly, this was not as hard as I expected, maybe because I was mentally prepared for it? However, as we embarked on this new journey, we still continued to face challenges with many aspects of our relationship, particularly our communication and trust. While my life has remained the same (minus him, of course!), he is now in a new environment with new people, which are two things that are foreign to me. Although I get a daily update on everything, I find it difficult to understand and empathize with him. I often have to be mindful when I talk to him that he is going through something that I don’t always understand. I try to control my emotions, but this has been the hardest part!

On a more positive note, I think the distance is allowing us to grow as individuals. We have always complemented each other in that we both made up for each other’s weaknesses. However, now that we have limited time to allot towards each other, we have to find our own way through things, and grow as individuals. We also seem to be becoming more patient with each other. As we both acknowledge that we are facing our own struggles due to distance, we are more understanding of each other’s feelings, and we wait for each other to express ourselves.

If you are also beginning a long-distance relationship with your partner, my advice would be to make goals with your partner. In the remaining 19 months we are apart, we have decided that he is going to visit me four times, I am going to graduate with a master’s degree, and we are going to ‘disclose’ our relationship to our families. Sometimes, it seems like 19 months may be too short of a period for all of these big milestones! Being a counsellor in-training, I would also suggest you be mindful about what you have right now. While our plans are not fixed, we hope that this distance is only temporary, which also means that I may only have a few more months of ‘freedom’ to spend time with my family. It is time for me to divert my attention towards my family and myself for a few months because who knows what’s next? I guess its time for me to count my blessings, rather than dwell on what I don’t have.

By: Nikita Singh

Nikita Singh is a graduate from the University of Toronto who is currently pursuing a Masters of Arts in Counselling Psychology from Yorkville University. Her future goal is to have her own private practice specializing in marriage and couples counselling.

 

Loving You From A Distance

We had been talking about him going to Medical school for a while now, but nothing really quite prepares you for a long-distance relationship. For four months prior to starting this journey, I was in complete denial that it would ever happen. It only quite hit me on the last day, as we kissed goodbye, and I realised that I wouldn’t see him for a few months. Let’s just say that things didn’t look to bright from where I was standing at that moment.

The first two days were probably the hardest two days of my life. We occasionally communicated using video chat, but seeing his new sense of excitement towards his new island life somehow broke me down emotionally. Seeing him in an unknown place served as a constant reminder that he was no longer here, and I took it as being synonymous to me not being part of his life anymore. In just two days, I could already feel myself getting more and more distant. The thought of the distance leading to a break up was always in the back of my mind and it would cause panic attacks.

They say time doesn’t stop for anybody, and surely it didn’t stop for me. A week later, I felt much better. I still felt extremely distant, but I had more control over my emotional outbursts. We still spoke every night and shared a few texts here and there, but I constantly felt anxious not knowing where he was or how he was doing emotionally. This anxiety was surely irrational, since I have been with him for almost five years now sharing many milestones, but what made me feel anxious was the uncertainty of how he was doing emotionally. Every time I tried to talk to him about his feelings, I only got “I need time to express myself.”

To make matters worse, soon after he got settled, he decided to travel with a friend for a few days before classes began. Despite knowing this was all part of the package, I almost felt betrayed; how could he go out there and have fun knowing that I was sitting here desperately longing and crying for his presence every second? Feeling hurt, I constantly told myself that travelling was his only way of coping with the stress he was experiencing, and I should be supportive and not voice my own sadness. I’ve been told by many that the next 20-months will fly by in the blink of an eye, but me and my boyfriend have yet to discover how we are going to love each other from a distance.

It’s been three weeks now, and I feel like the harder I try, the more disconnected I feel. So, my strategy for now is to not read too much into what is going on in his life. We have great conversations every night and I continuously tell myself that things could be worse. One suggestion I have for people who are going through something similar is to avoid thinking about how long you are both going to be apart. I know I am guilty of dwelling on the 20 months that me and my boyfriend will be apart, but I have been trying instead to break down the months, telling myself that it’s only 3 more months until I get to see him again. In the meantime, I have many small trips, events, and outings to look forward to that will keep me distracted. It’s time for me to connect with myself.

Nikita Singh 

Nikita Singh is a graduate from the University of Toronto who is currently pursuing a Masters of Arts in Counselling Psychology from Yorkville University. Her future goal is to have her own private practice specializing in marriage and couples counselling.

Tips on how to Survive a Long Distance Relationship

imagesMy husband and I shared a long distance relationship for a year before we got married. Most of what I am writing today is in retrospect of our experiences. It is undoubtedly tough to sustain a long distance relationship, but it is not impossible.

The challenge in a long distance relationship comes from managing our lives in the real world and making time for each other virtually, as well as keeping track of the time differences. As testing as it may sound, long distance relationships help strengthen the bond between a couple as it encourages effective communication, which is the foundation of any strong relationship. In a long distance relationship it can be easy to become attached to your phone, as it’s the only way of communicating with your partner. However, just like any other relationship, it’s important for you to set boundaries for yourself in order for you to form healthy habits.

Here are some tips that worked for us, and hopefully they come in handy for you too!

1. Break-Up with your Phone.

We tend to get busy with work and school, so when socializing with friends and family, take a break from your phone and enjoy their company. A lot of times, especially during the initial stages of a relationship, your partner becomes the center of your universes and all you want to do is to spend every waking minute talking to him/her. It helps to be mindful of the company you are in and not be on your phone all the time. Drop your partner a text saying you are out with company and will call him/her as soon as you are done.

Having some time alone, or “me time,” applies as much for couples in a long distance relationship as it does for any other couple. A lot of times, couples in long distance relationship struggle to understand the need for “me” time because they are not physically together. It is healthy to have some time alone to do what you enjoy and recharge, be it, watching your favorite soccer game or reading a book without checking your phone in-between. Having some time to yourself is just as important in a long distance relationship as it is in a regular relationship.

Long distance relationships, for the most part, give you the opportunity to prioritize your time well, allowing you to make time for yourself, your friends, your family and your partner.

2. Fighting Long Distance.

Having an argument with your partner can be emotionally draining as it is, but adding long distance to the equation can make it a lot more challenging. When having an argument with your partner in a long distance relationship, it is always better to talk it out over a video-chat or phone call versus texting. Texting, as convenient as it is, could be the reason why a lot of couples get into arguments because it allows room for misinterpretation.

As with everything else, long distance relationships have evolved with time. From writing letters and sending it by post to WhatsApp messaging, calling and video chats, technology has given couples the opportunity to be present without actually having to be present. What helped my husband (then boyfriend) and I to get through our distance was planning our next visit and what we would do together. This gave us the strength we needed to go on with our relationship and have something to look forward to.